PhD Course: Sociology of Emotions, Autumn, 2019 (7,5 ECTS), 28 – 30 August, Copenhagen University, 7- 8 November, University of Gothenburg

smiley-2979107_1920

Registration deadline June 1, 2019! 

Do you research into emotions or emotional matters? Do you consider certain emotions as part of understanding or explaining your research matter? Or, do you consider sociological theory interesting and relevant?  Then consider taking this Autumn course on sociology of emotions.

The course will familiarize students with classical and contemporary perspectives in the sociology of emotions and enable them to critically discuss theoretical assumptions, methodological approaches and empirical results within the sociology of emotions. Moreover, it will contribute to advancing a theoretical framework and methodological approach to a specific research problem in the student’s project. Students may examine the course with (7,5 hec) or without (3,5 hec) a course paper.

 

The course offers a broad overview of theories and research in the sociology of emotions, covering both structural and situational/interactional approaches to the role of emotions in social life. Part of the course deals with the students research projects, through which there is opportunity to discuss project ideas in relation to the perspectives on emotions presented. There will also be opportunity to discuss various methods employed and ways to apply and develop theory in the analysis of empirical data. The course offers both a broad perspective on the state of the art of the sociology of emotions, as well as in-depth specialization in the chosen area. (For further information see attached course program with all details here!)

 

Course teachers

Merete Monrad, Associate Professor, Ålborg University, monrad@socsci.aau.dk

Poul Poder, Associate Professor, University of Copenhagen, pp@soc.ku.dk

Åsa Wettergren, Professor, Gøteborg University asa.wettergren@socav.gu.se

 

Guest teacher: Jack Barbalet, Professor, Australian Catholic University, Australia

Course language: English.

 

Registration deadline June 1, 2019, to:

Anna-karin.wiberg@gu.se

or Lene El Mongy, phd@soc.ku.dk

Ian Hacking: Making Up People

I have recenetly been thinking about classification, which prompted me re-read a classic short paper by Ian Hacking called ‘Making Up People’ (pdf), which caused me to stumble upon this short video, which I am sharing here.

DRAFT PROGRAMME: Joint Conference of the European Sociological Association’s Sociology of Emotions Research Network (RN11) and the British Sociological Association’s Sociology of Emotions Study Group, University of Edinburgh, Scotland, August 28th –30th, 2018

blur-crowd-indoors-950902

13th Conference of the European Sociological Association, Athens, 2017: RN11 Session Overview (Sociology of Emotions)

The Board of the ESA RN11 Network (Stina, Monika, and myself) have finalized the schedule of papers for the big ESA Conference in Athens in August. The full programme will be released by the conference organizers soon, but the Sociology of Emotions sessions should look something like this (pdf, including details): ESARN11_Athens_Sessions_FINAL.

We look forward to meeting old and new friends in Athens, so if you are interested in affect and emotion, and are there, do come along and say hello!

RN11_Athens_Schedule_FINAL

 

 

 

Re: blogging: ‘From lens to lens-grinding’, and (the hope of) more to come…

Hazel_March_2017

I am eventually getting my mind around the possibility of attempting to begin to consider blogging a bit more and revitalising this old site with some new posts and reflections. At last. And it may not actually happen. Since I last wrote here my partner Fiona and I have had this alien creature crash-land into our lives, with devastating effects on sleep and productivity. It is now over a year old and still alive. We call it Hazel Rose (Hazel Rose Heaney=HRH, does nominative determinism work for initials?).

I am currently working on a load of stuff: theorizing affect and emotion from a process perspective, emotions and party politics, a related, ongoing project on the ’emotional state’ that I hope to get some additional funding toward, and a book, based on a revised version of my PhD, under contract with Routledge, and more. I may write about aspects of these projects here in the future.

Since coming to QUB I have been teaching a lot too, mostly social theory at UG and PG levels, and a bit of political sociology, sociology of emotions, narrative methods, and a few other odds and ends. I have been thinking about this — teaching theory, and ‘theory anxiety’ — a bit too, especially in relation to (my now completed) PGCHET assignments (which should work towards my FHEA qualification). I may add some thoughts here about all that also. This is still primarily a declaration of intent and an attempt to embarrass myself into blogging more, but I did write a blog on teaching and doing theory for Mark Murphy’s excellent site socialtheoryapplied last summer, which I intended to link to here, but didn’t. Here is that link now.

I’ll be in touch. I hope.

Jonathan

 

 

Deep Stories, Emotional Agendas and Politics By Arlie Hochschild

hochschild esa

I had the pleasure of attending and presenting at the 12th European Sociological Association Conference in Prague last August, where Prof. Arlie Hochschild (Berkeley) gave one of the plenaries at the opening of the event.

I really enjoyed the paper then, and a video of the plenary has been uploaded to the ESA website here.

The talk reflects, and reflects on, Hochschild’s recent interest in the connections between emotions and politics, and especially political persuasion, which intersect with my own ongoing interest in the linkages between emotions and power, and my new project on (what I am calling) the ’emotional state’. The talk here emerges from her recent work in the American South (especially Louisiana), and the interviews she conducted with members of the right there.

In the presentation, while of course foregrounding emotions and emotion management (to which literature in the sociology of emotions Hochschild has already made substantial, indeed, seminal, contributions to), she introduces a new concept of ‘deep stories’. These are  allegorical, collective and honour-focused stories that, she suggests, lie behind the growth of the right (especially the Tea Party) in the US (and presumably in Europe too). These stories and the emotional logic behind them, will help us to better understand the contemporary political polarization that is emerging in tandem with the increase in social inequality. They will also help us  to understand what it feels like to be a ‘Mary Beth’, and, rather than retreating to our own ideological silos, that we might be able to understand them, and each other, a bit better. It might also help to reaffirm the role of ‘honour’ in social and political processes. The social importance and explanatory value of a political sociology of emotions is here again underlined.  These themes will be explored further in her forthcoming book Strangers in Their Own Land: A Journey into the Heart of the Right. I will suspend judgement until I read that full treatment but the concepts here are certainly interesting. Sitting here in Belfast as I write this, I can, for instance, see some scope for the deployment of ‘deep stories’ in trying to understand the emotional logic of politics here too.

The abstract for the talk is below.

I begin with a paradox. In the United States, as in Europe, the gap between rich and poor has recently widened. At the same time, right-wing groups have risen for whom such a gap poses no problem at all. Based on new fieldwork on the U.S. Tea Party (approved by some 20% -30% of Americans) I ask: what emotional needs does such a movement meet? More basically, how does emotion underlie political belief? In answer I propose the concept of a deep story. It’s an allegorical, collectively shared, honor-focused, “feels-as-if” story. A man is standing in line for a ticket he feels he greatly deserves and which confers honor. At the front of the line is another man behind a dark glass window handing out tickets. In front and in back are others in line. To the side, is an official supervisor of the line. Then some people “cut into” the front of the line, and the story moves from there. Tickets are for the American Dream. The supervisor is the American president, and a rumor is flying that tickets are running out. They – and all of us — see through allegory. And once established, we protect it by pursuing an emotional agenda. This determines what a person wants to feel and know. Liberals have a deep story too. Each story – that of conservative and liberal — implies a strategy of action for addressing global capitalism, and the frightening idea that American –and European –dominance and prosperity may be a “prophecy that fails.” The idea of “deep stories” may help us communicate across a widening political divide and address the issues of difference, inequality –with imagination and compassion

Zygmunt Bauman: ”Liquid Modernity revisited”

In the introduction to my new Global Society class in QUB today I mentioned Bauman’s work on Liquid Modernity in the context of debates on globalization. In this lecture, given in Aarhus in 2012, he gives a useful overview of his approach to some of these issues, which (my own) students especially might find interesting.